Jekyll’s Lessons 2: Notebooks

 

Okay, okay, I know what you’re thinking.  This sounds like a terribad idea.  Notebooks are what drive you crazy, not keep you sane.  But it’s not what you’re thinking about.  Hear me out, here.

You want to know how I first realized it was all real?  Because I was watching for lost time.  I’d keep a notebook that, every hour, I would write a brief description of my last hour in.  Normally it was something extremely short, like “10-11 AM: in class” or “3-4 PM: sat on my lazy ass in front of the computer.”  Stuff like that.  It took maybe three seconds to write.  And if I lost time, I’d know right away if I had.  In fact, maybe just focusing on what I did with my time prevented me from losing some.  Thankfully, though, I did lose at least some time.  I say “thankfully” because that way I actually knew I was being stalked and not just paranoid.  One of the best weapons you can have is being certain.  A known known is much preferable to a known unknown.

Keeping a notebook early on is key to survival.  If you’re not being stalked, no problem.  You’re not losing time, and the worst that happens is people look at you a bit weird and you lose maybe a minute of your day writing down what happens.  But if you’re losing time, you’ll know right away.  On top of that, you can also track your sanity by your handwriting (check how later entries compare to earlier ones, and watch out for handwriting that isn’t yours).  If you end up completely flipping your shit, you’ll also probably end up subconsciously doodling all sorts of creepy stuff all over the notebooks.  But at least you’ll be aware of your mental state and how you’re using your time.  Later on, it can become either an obsession or an anchor (I’ll explain both of those in due time), but if it becomes an obsession, stop writing in them right away.

That’s today’s lesson: notebooks are to the stalked as towels are to hitchhikers.  Use ‘em and don’t lose ‘em…unless, of course, they become problematic.  In which case, lose them as quickly as possible.

-Jekyll

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Sopia
    Aug 20, 2011 @ 09:53:59

    “Problematic”? Like, let’s say…an infinite notebook with never-repeating entries may be problematic?

    Reply

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